The Transformative Nature of Hekate

She is a guardian, a guide, which is something of a far cry from her depictions as a matron of dark magic. She is neither dark nor light, but like most things in nature, she is gray. Like change itself. We are refined by change; made stronger, or weaker, or brighter, or darker. We are made more clearly what we are, shown ourselves and forced to come to terms with the dark parts within us as well as the light ones. The refinement of the soul requires the change that Hekate brings. She is a guide, a caretaker, a nurse; one who welcomes the company of lost spirits, who guides and protects them as they traverse the crossroads.

Night turns to day and Hekate is there, just as she is when day inevitably turns into night again. She is the precise moment that one thing becomes another. Through her the workings of the greater universe, the totality of deity, are enacted upon the world. And it is through her that we may learn to accept change, to accept the cycles of nature that are inherent in our lives.

It is therefore appropriate that she should be ever changing – that the goddess the Greeks first saw as “bright-coiffed” should in time become the “green-skinned hag,” only to cycle back. All the while she is becoming something infinitely more complex and yet just the same as she has always been.

Hekate changes, and she changes us.

— The Transformative Nature of Hekate by Marion Sipe, featured in the 2013 Witches’ Companion

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Orphic Hymn 1 to Hekate

Hekate Enoidia, Triodite, lovely dame,
Of earthly, watery and celestial frame,
Sepulchral in a saffron veil arrayed,
Pleased with dark ghosts that wander through the shade.
Perseia, solitary goddess, hail!
The world’s key-bearer, never doomed to fail.
In stags rejoicing, huntress, nightly seen,
And drawn by bulls, unconquerable queen.
Leader, nymph, nurse, on mountains wandering,
Hear the suppliants who with holy rites thy power revere,
And to the herdsman with a favoring mind draw near.

[ Source : theoi.com ]

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Hecate/Hekate : An Introduction by Sorita d’Este

Hekate is a Goddess of great antiquity. She is primordial, powerful and sometimes animalistic – and yet also sophisticated, modern and capable of adapting to different cultures. She is the Torchbearer, the Cosmic World Soul, the Guide and Companion. She is Mistress of the Restless Dead, who rules over the Heavens, Earth and Sea. She is the Keybearer who stands at the crossroads of life, death and initiation. Her devotees today, as throughout the ages, include philosophers, poets, sorcerers, theurgists, witches, root-cutters, enchantresses and ordinary people.

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Hecate : Origins, Symbolism & Correspondences

Hecate, Hekate (ek-a-te), or Hekat was originally a goddess of the wilderness and childbirth originating from Thrace, or among the Carians of Anatolia.

Popular cults venerating her as a mother goddess integrated her persona into Greek culture. In Ptolemaic Alexandria she ultimately achieved her connotations as a goddess of sorcery and her role as the ‘Queen of Ghosts’, in which guise she was transmitted to post-Renaissance culture. Today she is often seen as a goddess of witchcraft.

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Hekate : Dark Goddess of Magic & Sorcery

Hecate (sometimes spelled Hekate) was originally a Thracian, and pre-Olympian Greek goddess, and ruled over the realms of earth and fertility rituals. As a goddess of childbirth, she was often invoked for rites of puberty, and in some cases watched over maidens who were beginning to menstruate. Eventually, Hecate evolved to become a goddess of magic and sorcery. She was venerated as a mother goddess, and during the Ptolemaic period in Alexandria was elevated to her position as goddess of ghosts and the spirit world.

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Hecate : Moon Goddess of Mystery & Magic

Hecate, or Hekate, is the Goddess of the Underworld and the Goddess of the Dark Phase of the Moon. The name Hecate is believed to have been derived from one of the following Egyptian words: Hewitt, Hemet, or Heat. Hecate was the daughter of the Titans Parses and Astoria, and the mother of the nymph Scylla, although there are some who claim that she was actually the mother of the Goddess and Sorceress Circe.

Even though Hecate is sometimes associated with all three phases of the Moon, she is, more often then not, connected with the third stage of the Moon, which is the Dark Moon. Hecate has also been known as the “Queen of Ghosts,” the “Goddess of the Three-Way Crossroads” and the “Goddess of the Dead,” and it was there, at those three-way crossroads, that her followers held midnight rituals in her honor. She was also believed to roam the Earth on moonless nights, accompanied by her pack of hounds.

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