Hecate’s Calling Card

I came across this Tumblr post the other day about Deity Calling Cards.  This is what was written under Hekate so far :

Hekate:

I see radiant black hair that has golden stars shining within. Never as a ‘crone’ but more motherly, or a stern but loving aunt. And hounds…don’t forget the hounds. Torch-bearer. And yes, the beat that I hear when she is around makes you want to belly-dance. [BellonaNJ73]

golden blackness (very difficult to explain – like the blackest black that emanates gold light), teeth (which you will get a chance to see up close and personal if you, um, intrude), claws, bones, gold (did I say gold, ‘cos gold), grey hooded cloak, starry chiton (ie. made from stars and night and the vast depths of space), blue goldstone, The Hermit.

NO CHOCOLATE. NO WINE. Almond milk, honey, honeyed almond milk, almonds, feta, figs, shallots, pomegranate green tea.

I’ve seen her dancing, slow and graceful, very stylised. Usually near a tree – or even within the roots – or at the (stormy) ocean’s edge. She can appear slightly taller than average or absolutely giant. Generally neutral-serious, no nonsense; not stern, but not jovial either. [lacartetreizieme]

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The Transformative Nature of Hekate

She is a guardian, a guide, which is something of a far cry from her depictions as a matron of dark magic. She is neither dark nor light, but like most things in nature, she is gray. Like change itself. We are refined by change; made stronger, or weaker, or brighter, or darker. We are made more clearly what we are, shown ourselves and forced to come to terms with the dark parts within us as well as the light ones. The refinement of the soul requires the change that Hekate brings. She is a guide, a caretaker, a nurse; one who welcomes the company of lost spirits, who guides and protects them as they traverse the crossroads.

Night turns to day and Hekate is there, just as she is when day inevitably turns into night again. She is the precise moment that one thing becomes another. Through her the workings of the greater universe, the totality of deity, are enacted upon the world. And it is through her that we may learn to accept change, to accept the cycles of nature that are inherent in our lives.

It is therefore appropriate that she should be ever changing – that the goddess the Greeks first saw as “bright-coiffed” should in time become the “green-skinned hag,” only to cycle back. All the while she is becoming something infinitely more complex and yet just the same as she has always been.

Hekate changes, and she changes us.

— The Transformative Nature of Hekate by Marion Sipe, featured in the 2013 Witches’ Companion

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Orphic Hymn 1 to Hekate

Hekate Enoidia, Triodite, lovely dame,
Of earthly, watery and celestial frame,
Sepulchral in a saffron veil arrayed,
Pleased with dark ghosts that wander through the shade.
Perseia, solitary goddess, hail!
The world’s key-bearer, never doomed to fail.
In stags rejoicing, huntress, nightly seen,
And drawn by bulls, unconquerable queen.
Leader, nymph, nurse, on mountains wandering,
Hear the suppliants who with holy rites thy power revere,
And to the herdsman with a favoring mind draw near.

[ Source : theoi.com ]

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Hecate/Hekate : An Introduction by Sorita d’Este

Hekate is a Goddess of great antiquity. She is primordial, powerful and sometimes animalistic – and yet also sophisticated, modern and capable of adapting to different cultures. She is the Torchbearer, the Cosmic World Soul, the Guide and Companion. She is Mistress of the Restless Dead, who rules over the Heavens, Earth and Sea. She is the Keybearer who stands at the crossroads of life, death and initiation. Her devotees today, as throughout the ages, include philosophers, poets, sorcerers, theurgists, witches, root-cutters, enchantresses and ordinary people.

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Hecate : Origins, Symbolism & Correspondences

Hecate, Hekate (ek-a-te), or Hekat was originally a goddess of the wilderness and childbirth originating from Thrace, or among the Carians of Anatolia.

Popular cults venerating her as a mother goddess integrated her persona into Greek culture. In Ptolemaic Alexandria she ultimately achieved her connotations as a goddess of sorcery and her role as the ‘Queen of Ghosts’, in which guise she was transmitted to post-Renaissance culture. Today she is often seen as a goddess of witchcraft.

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50 Qs : Briefly Describe Your Path

Please describe briefly your Path. (full list of questions here)

Eclectic (for lack of a better term at the moment) with an emphasis on sea witchery. I follow the Wheel of the Year, moon lore and esbats. I identify with the dark and waning phases, the ‘Crone’ aspect, of the triple moon. I’m strongly drawn to the goddesses Hekate, and Arianrhod.

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